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resolution
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Sense and Sensibility
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resolution
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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as in: a New Year's resolution Define
a firm decision to do something
  • But the resolution was made only to be broken.

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  • Her New Year’s resolution is to read deeply at least one hour a day.
  • Are you making any New Year’s resolutions this year?

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as in: Her resolution weakened. Define
determination
  • ...to act with resolution,

  • There are no more uses of "resolution" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She ran each mile of the marathon with increasing resolution.
  • Through many years and hardships, her resolution to serve the poor never wavered.

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unspecified meaning
  • Her resolution was formed as she read.
  • But then at other times I have not resolution enough for it.

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  • The reason alleged was their determined resolution of not leaving their mother at that time of the year.
  • "Is Mr. Edward Ferrars," said Elinor, with resolution, "going to be married?"
  • Without considering that it was not in her mother’s plan to keep any horse, that if she were to alter her resolution in favour of this gift, she must buy another for the servant, and keep a servant to ride it, and after all, build a stable to receive them, she had accepted the present without hesitation, and told her sister of it in raptures.
  • She took the first opportunity of affronting her mother-in-law on the occasion, talking to her so expressively of her brother’s great expectations, of Mrs. Ferrars’s resolution that both her sons should marry well, and of the danger attending any young woman who attempted to DRAW HIM IN; that Mrs. Dashwood could neither pretend to be unconscious, nor endeavor to be calm.
  • Mrs. Jennings laughed heartily; and Elinor found that in her resolution to know where they had been, she had actually made her own woman enquire of Mr. Willoughby’s groom; and that she had by that method been informed that they had gone to Allenham, and spent a considerable time there in walking about the garden and going all over the house.
  • Donavan says there is nothing materially to be apprehended; her constitution is a good one, and her resolution equal to any thing.
  • To see Marianne, I felt, would be dreadful, and I even doubted whether I could see her again, and keep to my resolution.
  • —My resolution was soon made, and at eight o’clock this morning I was in my carriage.

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  • I had hoped that her regard for me would support her under any difficulty, and for some time it did; but at last the misery of her situation, for she experienced great unkindness, overcame all her resolution, and though she had promised me that nothing—but how blindly I relate!
  • How soon he had walked himself into the proper resolution, however, how soon an opportunity of exercising it occurred, in what manner he expressed himself, and how he was received, need not be particularly told.
  • "— "If such is your way of thinking," said Marianne, "if the loss of what is most valued is so easily to be made up by something else, your resolution, your self-command, are, perhaps, a little less to be wondered at.
  • He saw the necessity of inviting the Miss Steeles immediately, and his conscience was pacified by the resolution of inviting his sisters another year; at the same time, however, slyly suspecting that another year would make the invitation needless, by bringing Elinor to town as Colonel Brandon’s wife, and Marianne as THEIR visitor.
  • At last, however, my resolution was taken, and I had determined, as soon as I could engage her alone, to justify the attentions I had so invariably paid her, and openly assure her of an affection which I had already taken such pains to display.
  • But in the interim—in the interim of the very few hours that were to pass, before I could have an opportunity of speaking with her in private— a circumstance occurred—an unlucky circumstance, to ruin all my resolution, and with it all my comfort.
  • Elinor would not attempt to disturb a solitude so reasonable as what she now sought; and with a mind anxiously pre-arranging its result, and a resolution of reviving the subject again, should Marianne fail to do it, she turned into the parlour to fulfill her parting injunction.
  • Elinor, who had now been for some time reflecting on the propriety or impropriety of speedily hazarding her narration, without feeling at all nearer decision than at first, heard this; and perceiving that as reflection did nothing, resolution must do all, soon found herself leading to the fact.
  • Elinor, according to her expectation, saw on the two or three following days, that Marianne did not continue to gain strength as she had done; but while her resolution was unsubdued, and she still tried to appear cheerful and easy, her sister could safely trust to the effect of time upon her health.
  • She now found, that in spite of herself, she had always admitted a hope, while Edward remained single, that something would occur to prevent his marrying Lucy; that some resolution of his own, some mediation of friends, or some more eligible opportunity of establishment for the lady, would arise to assist the happiness of all.
  • To consult with Colonel Brandon on the best means of effecting the latter, was a thought which immediately followed the resolution of its performance; and as soon she had rung up the maid to take her place by her sister, she hastened down to the drawing-room, where she knew he was generally to be found at a much later hour than the present.
  • Mrs. Jennings, however, with a kindness of heart which made Elinor really love her, declared her resolution of not stirring from Cleveland as long as Marianne remained ill, and of endeavouring, by her own attentive care, to supply to her the place of the mother she had taken her from; and Elinor found her on every occasion a most willing and active helpmate, desirous to share in all her fatigues, and often by her better experience in nursing, of material use.
  • "Yes," continued Elinor, gathering more resolution, as some of the worst was over, "Colonel Brandon means it as a testimony of his concern for what has lately passed—for the cruel situation in which the unjustifiable conduct of your family has placed you—a concern which I am sure Marianne, myself, and all your friends, must share; and likewise as a proof of his high esteem for your general character, and his particular approbation of your behaviour on the present occasion."
  • …the readiness of the house, to which Colonel Brandon, with an eager desire for the accommodation of Elinor, was making considerable improvements; and after waiting some time for their completion, after experiencing, as usual, a thousand disappointments and delays from the unaccountable dilatoriness of the workmen, Elinor, as usual, broke through the first positive resolution of not marrying till every thing was ready, and the ceremony took place in Barton church early in the autumn.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a New Year's resolution Define
a firm decision to do something
as in: a United Nations resolution Define
a formal expression of opinion arrived at by a group vote
as in: Her resolution weakened. Define
determination
as in: a dispute resolution fund Define
a solution or outcome
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