To see all instances of the word
used in
Sense and Sensibility
please enable javascript.

Used in
Sense and Sensibility
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • Domestic happiness is out of the question.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • All his wishes centered in domestic comfort and the quiet of private life.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Lady Middleton piqued herself upon the elegance of her table, and of all her domestic arrangements; and from this kind of vanity was her greatest enjoyment in any of their parties.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • His wife was not always out of humour, nor his home always uncomfortable; and in his breed of horses and dogs, and in sporting of every kind, he found no inconsiderable degree of domestic felicity.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He would have had a wife of whose temper he could make no complaint, but he would have been always necessitous—always poor; and probably would soon have learned to rank the innumerable comforts of a clear estate and good income as of far more importance, even to domestic happiness, than the mere temper of a wife.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He was received by Mrs. Dashwood with more than politeness; with a kindness which Sir John's account of him and her own gratitude prompted; and every thing that passed during the visit tended to assure him of the sense, elegance, mutual affection, and domestic comfort of the family to whom accident had now introduced him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • They settled in town, received very liberal assistance from Mrs. Ferrars, were on the best terms imaginable with the Dashwoods; and setting aside the jealousies and ill-will continually subsisting between Fanny and Lucy, in which their husbands of course took a part, as well as the frequent domestic disagreements between Robert and Lucy themselves, nothing could exceed the harmony in which they all lived together.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • …could not help smiling at this display of indifference towards the manners of a person, to whom she had often had difficulty in persuading Marianne to behave with tolerable politeness; and resolved within herself, that if her sister persisted in going, she would go likewise, as she did not think it proper that Marianne should be left to the sole guidance of her own judgment, or that Mrs. Jennings should be abandoned to the mercy of Marianne for all the comfort of her domestic hours.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: domestic happiness
as in: the domestic market
as in: a domestic animal like a dog
as in: GDP of the United States
To see an overview of word senses (including some not listed above), click here.

Go to Book Vocabulary
VerbalWorkout Learn more easily.   Think more clearly.   Express more effectively.