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reverie
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Sense and Sensibility
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reverie
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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  • From a reverie of this kind, as she sat at her drawing-table, she was roused one morning, soon after Edward’s leaving them, by the arrival of company.
  • "—As she said this, she sunk into a reverie for a few moments;—but rousing herself again, "Now, Edward," said she, calling his attention to the prospect, "here is Barton valley.
  • From a reverie of this kind she was recalled at the end of some minutes by Willoughby, who, rousing himself from a reverie at least equally painful, started up in preparation for going, and said— "There is no use in staying here; I must be off."
  • From a reverie of this kind she was recalled at the end of some minutes by Willoughby, who, rousing himself from a reverie at least equally painful, started up in preparation for going, and said— "There is no use in staying here; I must be off."
  • Edward, who had till then looked any where, rather than at her, saw her hurry away, and perhaps saw— or even heard, her emotion; for immediately afterwards he fell into a reverie, which no remarks, no inquiries, no affectionate address of Mrs. Dashwood could penetrate, and at last, without saying a word, quitted the room, and walked out towards the village—leaving the others in the greatest astonishment and perplexity on a change in his situation, so wonderful and so sudden;—a

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  • I was lost in reverie and missed her third point.
  • At this memory, I smile, but Ruth’s voice cuts through my reverie, her disappointment evident.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Longest Ride

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