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affectation
in
Sense and Sensibility
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affectation
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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  • He is fastidious and will have an affectation of his own.
  • Willoughby’s behaviour in taking leave of them, his embarrassment, and affectation of cheerfulness, and, above all, his unwillingness to accept her mother’s invitation, a backwardness so unlike a lover, so unlike himself, greatly disturbed her.
  • "I suspect," said Elinor, "that to avoid one kind of affectation, Edward here falls into another.
  • "There now," said Miss Steele, affectedly simpering, "everybody laughs at me so about the Doctor, and I cannot think why.
  • (Laughing affectedly.

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  • Her apparent wealth was proven to be an affectation.
  • He’s a good actor. He can change affectations and mannerisms like most people change clothes.

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