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engrossed
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Sense and Sensibility
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engrossed -- as in: engrossed in the book
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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  • He and I have been at times thrown a good deal together, while you have been wholly engrossed on the most affectionate principle by my mother.
  • It was engrossed by the extraordinary silence of her sister and Willoughby on the subject, which they must know to be peculiarly interesting to them all.
  • Her mind was inevitably at liberty; her thoughts could not be chained elsewhere; and the past and the future, on a subject so interesting, must be before her, must force her attention, and engross her memory, her reflection, and her fancy.
  • She feared that under this persuasion she had been unjust, inattentive, nay, almost unkind, to her Elinor;— that Marianne’s affliction, because more acknowledged, more immediately before her, had too much engrossed her tenderness, and led her away to forget that in Elinor she might have a daughter suffering almost as much, certainly with less self-provocation, and greater fortitude.
  • The day of separation and departure arrived; and Marianne, after taking so particular and lengthened a leave of Mrs. Jennings, one so earnestly grateful, so full of respect and kind wishes as seemed due to her own heart from a secret acknowledgment of past inattention, and bidding Colonel Brandon farewell with a cordiality of a friend, was carefully assisted by him into the carriage, of which he seemed anxious that she should engross at least half.

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  • She was so engrossed in her conversation, she didn’t realize the bell had rung.
  • he was growing quite inattentive to other people, and wholly engrossed by her.
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice

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