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malicious
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Sense and Sensibility
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malicious
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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  • Her wretchedness I could have borne, but her passion—her malice—At all events it must be appeased.
  • That Lucy had certainly meant to deceive, to go off with a flourish of malice against him in her message by Thomas, was perfectly clear to Elinor; and Edward himself, now thoroughly enlightened on her character, had no scruple in believing her capable of the utmost meanness of wanton ill-nature.
  • When the note was shown to Elinor, as it was within ten minutes after its arrival, it gave her, for the first time, some share in the expectations of Lucy; for such a mark of uncommon kindness, vouchsafed on so short an acquaintance, seemed to declare that the good-will towards her arose from something more than merely malice against herself; and might be brought, by time and address, to do every thing that Lucy wished.

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  • I am not interested in hearing malicious gossip.
  • Words can be like baseball bats when used maliciously.
    Sidney Madwed

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