To see all instances of the word
incumbent
used in
Sense and Sensibility
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incumbent
Used in
Sense and Sensibility
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  • Very well—and for the next presentation to a living of that value—supposing the late incumbent to have been old and sickly, and likely to vacate it soon—he might have got I dare say—fourteen hundred pounds.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Marianne had retreated as much as possible out of sight, to conceal her distress; and Margaret, understanding some part, but not the whole of the case, thought it incumbent on her to be dignified, and therefore took a seat as far from him as she could, and maintained a strict silence.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I dare say you have seen enough of Edward to know that he would prefer the church to every other profession; now my plan is that he should take orders as soon as he can, and then through your interest, which I am sure you would be kind enough to use out of friendship for him, and I hope out of some regard to me, your brother might be persuaded to give him Norland living; which I understand is a very good one, and the present incumbent not likely to live a great while.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • — It is a rectory, but a small one; the late incumbent, I believe, did not make more than 200 L per annum, and though it is certainly capable of improvement, I fear, not to such an amount as to afford him a very comfortable income.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: is the incumbent
as in: incumbent upon her to
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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