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fetter
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Sense and Sensibility
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fetter
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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  • The shortness of his visit, the steadiness of his purpose in leaving them, originated in the same fettered inclination, the same inevitable necessity of temporizing with his mother.
  • Or at least, if she did not bring herself quite to rejoice in Edward’s being fettered to Lucy, she determined, that had Lucy been more amiable, she OUGHT to have rejoiced.
  • And at any rate, she lost nothing by continuing the engagement, for she has proved that it fettered neither her inclination nor her actions.
  • And even now, I cannot comprehend on what motive she acted, or what fancied advantage it could be to her, to be fettered to a man for whom she had not the smallest regard, and who had only two thousand pounds in the world.

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  • She is fettered by old ideas whose time has passed.
  • the law would fetter the free press

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