To better see all uses of the word
Sense and Sensibility
please enable javascript.

Used In
Sense and Sensibility
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Elinor was not prepared for such a question, and having no answer ready, was obliged to adopt the simple and common expedient, of asking what he meant?
  • It may be proper to conceal their engagement (if they ARE engaged) from Mrs. Smith— and if that is the case, it must be highly expedient for Willoughby to be but little in Devonshire at present.
  • She had wandered away to a subject on which Elinor had nothing to say, and therefore soon judged it expedient to find her way back again to the first.
  • After that, I suppose, I WAS wrong in remaining so much in Sussex, and the arguments with which I reconciled myself to the expediency of it, were no better than these:—The danger is my own; I am doing no injury to anybody but myself.
  • They passed some months in great happiness at Dawlish; for she had many relations and old acquaintances to cut—and he drew several plans for magnificent cottages;— and from thence returning to town, procured the forgiveness of Mrs. Ferrars, by the simple expedient of asking it, which, at Lucy’s instigation, was adopted.

  • There are no more uses of "expedient" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • It was a necessary expedient to get the job done.
  • Until the new computer system is in place, e-mailing sensitive data will be a necessary expedient.

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading