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effusion
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Sense and Sensibility
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effusion -- as in: effusions of domestic joy
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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  • Come, come; this is all an effusion of immediate want of spirits, Edward.
  • Such violence of affliction indeed could not be supported for ever; it sunk within a few days into a calmer melancholy; but these employments, to which she daily recurred, her solitary walks and silent meditations, still produced occasional effusions of sorrow as lively as ever.
  • Elinor, who did justice to Mrs. Jennings’s kindness, though its effusions were often distressing, and sometimes almost ridiculous, made her those acknowledgments, and returned her those civilities, which her sister could not make or return for herself.
  • His was an involuntary confidence, an irrepressible effusion to a soothing friend—not an application to a parent.
  • A few minutes more spent in the same kind of effusion, concluded his visit; and with repeated assurances to his sisters that he really believed there was no material danger in Fanny’s indisposition, and that they need not therefore be very uneasy about it, he went away; leaving the three ladies unanimous in their sentiments on the present occasion, as far at least as it regarded Mrs. Ferrars’s conduct, the Dashwoods’, and Edward’s.

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  • I read her latest effusion about the health care mess.
  • greeted him with effusion

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