To better see all uses of the word
Sense and Sensibility
please enable javascript.

Used In
Sense and Sensibility
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Oh, Elinor, how incomprehensible are your feelings!
  • Most unwilling was she to awaken from such a dream of felicity to comprehend all the unhappy truths which attended the affair; and for some time she refused to submit to them.
  • It was contrary to every doctrine of her’s that difference of fortune should keep any couple asunder who were attracted by resemblance of disposition; and that Elinor’s merit should not be acknowledged by every one who knew her, was to her comprehension impossible.
  • My behaviour must have seemed strange to you then; but now you will comprehend it.
  • —They are brought more within my comprehension.
  • And how you will explain away any part of your guilt in that dreadful business, I confess is beyond my comprehension.
  • She speedily comprehended all his merits; the persuasion of his regard for Elinor perhaps assisted her penetration; but she really felt assured of his worth: and even that quietness of manner, which militated against all her established ideas of what a young man’s address ought to be, was no longer uninteresting when she knew his heart to be warm and his temper affectionate.
  • Why Mr. Ferrars was to have been written to about it in such a hurry, she could not immediately comprehend.
  • To the former her raillery was probably, as far as it regarded only himself, perfectly indifferent; but to the latter it was at first incomprehensible; and when its object was understood, she hardly knew whether most to laugh at its absurdity, or censure its impertinence, for she considered it as an unfeeling reflection on the colonel’s advanced years, and on his forlorn condition as an old bachelor.
  • The party, like other musical parties, comprehended a great many people who had real taste for the performance, and a great many more who had none at all; and the performers themselves were, as usual, in their own estimation, and that of their immediate friends, the first private performers in England.
  • The forgiveness, at first, indeed, as was reasonable, comprehended only Robert; and Lucy, who had owed his mother no duty and therefore could have transgressed none, still remained some weeks longer unpardoned.
  • And with this pleasing anticipation, she sat down to reconsider the past, recall the words and endeavour to comprehend all the feelings of Edward; and, of course, to reflect on her own with discontent.
  • And even now, I cannot comprehend on what motive she acted, or what fancied advantage it could be to her, to be fettered to a man for whom she had not the smallest regard, and who had only two thousand pounds in the world.
  • How they could be thrown together, and by what attraction Robert could be drawn on to marry a girl, of whose beauty she had herself heard him speak without any admiration,—a girl too already engaged to his brother, and on whose account that brother had been thrown off by his family—it was beyond her comprehension to make out.
  • — She had seen enough of her pride, her meanness, and her determined prejudice against herself, to comprehend all the difficulties that must have perplexed the engagement, and retarded the marriage, of Edward and herself, had he been otherwise free;—and she had seen almost enough to be thankful for her OWN sake, that one greater obstacle preserved her from suffering under any other of Mrs. Ferrars’s creation, preserved her from all dependence upon her caprice, or any solicitude for herů
  • "Upon my word," replied Elinor, "I cannot tell you, for I do not perfectly comprehend the meaning of the word.
  • Edward saw enough to comprehend, not only the meaning of others, but such of Marianne’s expressions as had puzzled him before; and when their visitors left them, he went immediately round her, and said, in a whisper, "I have been guessing.

  • There are no more uses of "comprehend" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • I don’t think she comprehends how dangerous this has become.
  • Washington fails to comprehend the change in China’s strategy.

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading