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censure
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Sense and Sensibility
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censure
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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  • I value not her censure any more than I should do her commendation.
  • Marianne severely censured herself for what she had said; but her own forgiveness might have been more speedy, had she known how little offence it had given her sister.
  • If their praise is censure, your censure may be praise, for they are not more undiscerning, than you are prejudiced and unjust.
  • If their praise is censure, your censure may be praise, for they are not more undiscerning, than you are prejudiced and unjust.
  • Elinor sighed over the fancied necessity of this; but to a man and a soldier she presumed not to censure it.
  • Elinor kept her concern and her censure to herself; and was very thankful that Marianne was not present, to share the provocation.
  • It was censure in common use, and easily given.
  • In Mrs. Dashwood’s estimation he was as faultless as in Marianne’s; and Elinor saw nothing to censure in him but a propensity, in which he strongly resembled and peculiarly delighted her sister, of saying too much what he thought on every occasion, without attention to persons or circumstances.
  • Little did Mr. Willoughby imagine, I suppose, when his looks censured me for incivility in breaking up the party, that I was called away to the relief of one whom he had made poor and miserable; but HAD he known it, what would it have availed?
  • —Do not, my dearest Elinor, let your kindness defend what I know your judgment must censure.
  • To the former her raillery was probably, as far as it regarded only himself, perfectly indifferent; but to the latter it was at first incomprehensible; and when its object was understood, she hardly knew whether most to laugh at its absurdity, or censure its impertinence, for she considered it as an unfeeling reflection on the colonel’s advanced years, and on his forlorn condition as an old bachelor.
  • Without shutting herself up from her family, or leaving the house in determined solitude to avoid them, or lying awake the whole night to indulge meditation, Elinor found every day afforded her leisure enough to think of Edward, and of Edward’s behaviour, in every possible variety which the different state of her spirits at different times could produce,—with tenderness, pity, approbation, censure, and doubt.
  • Yet as she was convinced that Marianne’s affection for Willoughby, could leave no hope of Colonel Brandon’s success, whatever the event of that affection might be, and at the same time wished to shield her conduct from censure, she thought it most prudent and kind, after some consideration, to say more than she really knew or believed.
  • …vent, was able not only to see the Miss Dashwoods from the first without the smallest emotion, but very soon to see them without recollecting a word of the matter; and having thus supported the dignity of her own sex, and spoken her decided censure of what was wrong in the other, she thought herself at liberty to attend to the interest of her own assemblies, and therefore determined (though rather against the opinion of Sir John) that as Mrs. Willoughby would at once be a woman of…

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  • They censured him for bringing dishonor upon the Senate.
  • In spite of the censure of her colleagues, she believed she had done the right thing.

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