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abhor
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Sense and Sensibility
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abhor
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Sense and Sensibility
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  • It has given me such an abhorrence of annuities, that I am sure I would not pin myself down to the payment of one for all the world.
  • I abhor every common-place phrase by which wit is intended; and ’setting one’s cap at a man,’ or ’making a conquest,’ are the most odious of all.
  • "I confess," replied Elinor, "that while I am at Barton Park, I never think of tame and quiet children with any abhorrence."
  • But Marianne abhorred all concealment where no real disgrace could attend unreserve; and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common-place and mistaken notions.
  • —I cannot express my own abhorrence of myself.
  • Willoughby, he, whom only half an hour ago she had abhorred as the most worthless of men, Willoughby, in spite of all his faults, excited a degree of commiseration for the sufferings produced by them, which made her think of him as now separated for ever from her family, with a tenderness, a regret, rather in proportion, as she soon acknowledged within herself—to his wishes than to his merits.
  • She paused over it for some time with indignant astonishment; then read it again and again; but every perusal only served to increase her abhorrence of the man, and so bitter were her feelings against him, that she dared not trust herself to speak, lest she might wound Marianne still deeper by treating their disengagement, not as a loss to her of any possible good but as an escape from the worst and most irremediable of all evils, a connection, for life, with an unprincipled man, as a

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  • She abhors violence.
  • I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence.
    Frederick Douglass

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