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proprietor
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Jane Eyre
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proprietor
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • Mr. Rochester was Mr. Rochester in her eyes; a gentleman, a landed proprietor — nothing more: she inquired and searched no further, and evidently wondered at my wish to gain a more definite notion of his identity.
  • "Yes," she said, "it is a pretty place; but I fear it will be getting out of order, unless Mr. Rochester should take it into his head to come and reside here permanently; or, at least, visit it rather oftener: great houses and fine grounds require the presence of the proprietor."
  • I found it a large, handsome residence, showing abundant evidences of wealth in the proprietor.
  • Her salary will be thirty pounds a year: her house is already furnished, very simply, but sufficiently, by the kindness of a lady, Miss Oliver; the only daughter of the sole rich man in my parish — Mr. Oliver, the proprietor of a needle-factory and iron-foundry in the valley.

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  • After 40 years of greeting guests in person, the proprietor is retiring.
  • No tax can be laid on land which will not affect the proprietor of millions of acres as well as the proprietor of a single acre.
    Alexander Hamilton  --  The Federalist Papers

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