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obligation
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Jane Eyre
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obligation
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • There is no debt, benefit, burden, obligation, in the case.
  • Nothing else that has being would have been tolerable to me in the character of creditor for such an obligation: but you: it is different; — I feel your benefits no burden, Jane.
  • Bessie answered not; but ere long, addressing me, she said — "You ought to be aware, Miss, that you are under obligations to Mrs. Reed: she keeps you: if she were to turn you off, you would have to go to the poorhouse."
  • I only want an easy mind, sir; not crushed by crowded obligations.
  • A reception of finished politeness would probably have confused me: I could not have returned or repaid it by answering grace and elegance on my part; but harsh caprice laid me under no obligation; on the contrary, a decent quiescence, under the freak of manner, gave me the advantage.
  • I am not under the slightest obligation to go to India, especially with strangers.
  • The sternest-seeming stoic is human after all; and to "burst" with boldness and good-will into "the silent sea" of their souls is often to confer on them the first of obligations.
  • Were you to argue, object, and annoy me for a year, I could not forego the delicious pleasure of which I have caught a glimpse — that of repaying, in part, a mighty obligation, and winning to myself lifelong friends.

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  • She feels that helping him is her obligation.
  • I have a family obligation Saturday afternoon.

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