To better see all uses of the word
Jane Eyre
in
Jane Eyre
please enable javascript.

Jane Eyre
Used In
Jane Eyre
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Abbot and Bessie, I believe I gave orders that Jane Eyre should be left in the red-room till I came to her myself.
  • Well, you have been crying, Miss Jane Eyre; can you tell me what about?
  • Well, Jane Eyre, and are you a good child?
  • How dare you affirm that, Jane Eyre?
  • "Is there a little girl called Jane Eyre here?" she asked.
  • "I came on purpose to find you, Jane Eyre," said she; "I want you in my room; and as Helen Burns is with you, she may come too."
  • "In the name of all the elves in Christendom, is that Jane Eyre?" he demanded.
  • Finally, I have alluded to Mr. Thackeray, because to him — if he will accept the tribute of a total stranger — I have dedicated this second edition of "JANE EYRE."
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte PREFACE A preface to the first edition of "Jane Eyre" being unnecessary, I gave none: this second edition demands a few words both of acknowledgment and miscellaneous remark.
  • Yes, sir, Jane Eyre.
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte PREFACE A preface to the first edition of "Jane Eyre" being unnecessary, I gave none: this second edition demands a few words both of acknowledgment and miscellaneous remark.
  • Eyre — Jane Eyre.
  • Jane Eyre, sir.
  • " "This is the state of things I quite approve," returned Mrs. Reed; "had I sought all England over, I could scarcely have found a system more exactly fitting a child like Jane Eyre.
  • Miss Temple, having assembled the whole school, announced that inquiry had been made into the charges alleged against Jane Eyre, and that she was most happy to be able to pronounce her completely cleared from every imputation.
  • NOTE TO THE THIRD EDITION I avail myself of the opportunity which a third edition of "Jane Eyre" affords me, of again addressing a word to the Public, to explain that my claim to the title of novelist rests on this one work alone.
  • I mean the timorous or carping few who doubt the tendency of such books as "Jane Eyre:" in whose eyes whatever is unusual is wrong; whose ears detect in each protest against bigotry — that parent of crime — an insult to piety, that regent of God on earth.
  • "Is this Jane Eyre?" she said.
  • I wished to see Jane Eyre, and I fancy a likeness where none exists: besides, in eight years she must be so changed.
  • I wrote to him; I said I was sorry for his disappointment, but Jane Eyre was dead: she had died of typhus fever at Lowood.
  • When we parted, she said: "Good-bye, cousin Jane Eyre; I wish you well: you have some sense."
  • Jewels for Jane Eyre sounds unnatural and strange: I would rather not have them.
  • And yet where was the Jane Eyre of yesterday?
  • Jane Eyre, who had been an ardent, expectant woman — almost a bride, was a cold, solitary girl again: her life was pale; her prospects were desolate.
  • And this is Jane Eyre?
  • You are not one of the Gibsons; and yet I know you — that face, and the eyes and forehead, are quiet familiar to me: you are like — why, you are like Jane Eyre!
  • Are you Jane Eyre?
  • I am Jane Eyre.
  • It was only yesterday morning, however, that Bessie understood she was pronouncing your name; and at last she made out the words, ’Bring Jane — fetch Jane Eyre: I want to speak to her.’
  • I heard him in a blubbering tone commence the tale of how "that nasty Jane Eyre" had flown at him like a mad cat: he was stopped rather harshly — "Don’t talk to me about her, John: I told you not to go near her; she is not worthy of notice; I do not choose that either you or your sisters should associate with her."
  • "My dear master," I answered, "I am Jane Eyre: I have found you out — I am come back to you."
  • Your name is Jane Eyre?
  • He got up, held it close to my eyes: and I read, traced in Indian ink, in my own handwriting, the words "JANE EYRE" — the work doubtless of some moment of abstraction.
  • Jane Eyre!
  • …since last night — of the general state of mind in which I had indulged for nearly a fortnight past; Reason having come forward and told, in her own quiet way a plain, unvarnished tale, showing how I had rejected the real, and rabidly devoured the ideal; — I pronounced judgment to this effect:— That a greater fool than Jane Eyre had never breathed the breath of life; that a more fantastic idiot had never surfeited herself on sweet lies, and swallowed poison as if it were nectar.
  • It was short, and thus conceived:— "Madam, — Will you have the goodness to send me the address of my niece, Jane Eyre, and to tell me how she is?
  • ) "It is Jane Eyre, sir."
  • "And then you won’t know me, sir; and I shall not be your Jane Eyre any longer, but an ape in a harlequin’s jacket — a jay in borrowed plumes.
  • "Briggs wrote to me of a Jane Eyre:" he said, "the advertisements demanded a Jane Eyre: I knew a Jane Elliott.
  • Jane Eyre," was all he said.
  • "Briggs wrote to me of a Jane Eyre:" he said, "the advertisements demanded a Jane Eyre: I knew a Jane Elliott.
  • "Listen, then, Jane Eyre, to your sentence: tomorrow, place the glass before you, and draw in chalk your own picture, faithfully, without softening one defect; omit no harsh line, smooth away no displeasing irregularity; write under it, ’Portrait of a Governess, disconnected, poor, and plain.’

  • There are no more uses of "Jane Eyre" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • One hundred and sixty pages of Jane Eyre.
    Gary D. Schmidt  --  Okay for Now
  • It’s her favorite novel, Jane Eyre, and she wanted to own it, to have it in her possession.
    Christina Baker Kline  --  Orphan Train

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading