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indulge
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Jane Eyre
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indulge
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • Georgiana, who had a spoiled temper, a very acrid spite, a captious and insolent carriage, was universally indulged.
  • The action was more frank and fearless than any I was habituated to indulge in: somehow it pleased her.
  • "I DO love you," I said, "more than ever: but I must not show or indulge the feeling: and this is the last time I must express it."
  • My pupil was a lively child, who had been spoilt and indulged, and therefore was sometimes wayward; but as she was committed entirely to my care, and no injudicious interference from any quarter ever thwarted my plans for her improvement, she soon forgot her little freaks, and became obedient and teachable.
  • Having indulged a while in this sedative, she raised her bent body, took the pipe from her lips, and while gazing steadily at the fire, said very deliberately — "You are cold; you are sick; and you are silly."
  • Surely the Mary Ann Wilson I have mentioned was inferior to my first acquaintance: she could only tell me amusing stories, and reciprocate any racy and pungent gossip I chose to indulge in; while, if I have spoken truth of Helen, she was qualified to give those who enjoyed the privilege of her converse a taste of far higher things.
  • She had been indulged from her birth, but was not absolutely spoilt.
  • He loved me so truly, that he knew no reluctance in profiting by my attendance: he felt I loved him so fondly, that to yield that attendance was to indulge my sweetest wishes.
  • Well then, Jane, call to aid your fancy:— suppose you were no longer a girl well reared and disciplined, but a wild boy indulged from childhood upwards; imagine yourself in a remote foreign land; conceive that you there commit a capital error, no matter of what nature or from what motives, but one whose consequences must follow you through life and taint all your existence.
  • Arraigned at my own bar, Memory having given her evidence of the hopes, wishes, sentiments I had been cherishing since last night — of the general state of mind in which I had indulged for nearly a fortnight past; Reason having come forward and told, in her own quiet way a plain, unvarnished tale, showing how I had rejected the real, and rabidly devoured the ideal; — I pronounced judgment to this effect:— That a greater fool than Jane Eyre had never breathed the breath of life; that a
  • "With me," said I, "it is fully as much a matter of feeling as of conscience: I must indulge my feelings; I so seldom have had an opportunity of doing so.

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  • She indulges her children more than is good for them.
  • I indulge my taste for sweets more than is good for me.

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