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endure
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Jane Eyre
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endure
Used In
Jane Eyre
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as in: endured the pain Define
to suffer through (or put up with something difficult or unpleasant)
  • The burden must be carried; the want provided for; the suffering endured; the responsibility fulfilled.
  • I heard her with wonder: I could not comprehend this doctrine of endurance; and still less could I understand or sympathise with the forbearance she expressed for her chastiser.

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  • My heart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears, which I deemed the rushing of wings; something seemed near me; I was oppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down; I rushed to the door and shook the lock in desperate effort.
  • Miss Ingram ought to be clement, for she has it in her power to inflict a chastisement beyond mortal endurance.
  • I honour endurance, perseverance, industry, talent; because these are the means by which men achieve great ends and mount to lofty eminence.

  • There are no more uses of "endure" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • I endured insult and injury without complaint.
  • As a soldier, she was prepared to endure hardship and even to sacrifice her life for others.

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unspecified meaning
  • Accustomed to John Reed’s abuse, I never had an idea of replying to it; my care was how to endure the blow which would certainly follow the insult.
  • I cannot endure it — let me be punished some other way!

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  • Adele went to kiss him before quitting the room: he endured the caress, but scarcely seemed to relish it more than Pilot would have done, nor so much.
  • Jane, I am not a gentle-tempered man — you forget that: I am not long-enduring; I am not cool and dispassionate.
  • It is far better to endure patiently a smart which nobody feels but yourself, than to commit a hasty action whose evil consequences will extend to all connected with you; and besides, the Bible bids us return good for evil.
  • Not a hint, however, did she drop about sending me to school: still I felt an instinctive certainty that she would not long endure me under the same roof with her; for her glance, now more than ever, when turned on me, expressed an insuperable and rooted aversion.
  • I will endure only sense and resolution.
  • I only ask you to endure one more night under this roof, Jane; and then, farewell to its miseries and terrors for ever!
  • But I am not angry, Jane: I only love you too well; and you had steeled your little pale face with such a resolute, frozen look, I could not endure it.
  • In listening, I sobbed convulsively; for I could repress what I endured no longer; I was obliged to yield, and I was shaken from head to foot with acute distress.

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  • I know that had I been a sanguine, brilliant, careless, exacting, handsome, romping child — though equally dependent and friendless — Mrs. Reed would have endured my presence more complacently; her children would have entertained for me more of the cordiality of fellow-feeling; the servants would have been less prone to make me the scapegoat of the nursery.
  • I will write to Madeira the moment I get home, and tell my uncle John I am going to be married, and to whom: if I had but a prospect of one day bringing Mr. Rochester an accession of fortune, I could better endure to be kept by him now.
  • I had endured, he was certain, more than I had confessed to him.
  • Yet as little could he endure that a son of his should be a poor man.
  • We were born to strive and endure — you as well as I: do so.
  • Her constitution is both sound and elastic; — better calculated to endure variations of climate than many more robust.
  • Can I receive from him the bridal ring, endure all the forms of love (which I doubt not he would scrupulously observe) and know that the spirit was quite absent?
  • It would be fruitless to attempt to explain; but there is a point on which I have long endured painful doubt, and I can go nowhere till by some means that doubt is removed.
  • Our clothing was insufficient to protect us from the severe cold: we had no boots, the snow got into our shoes and melted there: our ungloved hands became numbed and covered with chilblains, as were our feet: I remember well the distracting irritation I endured from this cause every evening, when my feet inflamed; and the torture of thrusting the swelled, raw, and stiff toes into my shoes in the morning.
  • That I merited all I endured, I acknowledged — that I could scarcely endure more, I pleaded; and the alpha and omega of my heart’s wishes broke involuntarily from my lips in the words — ’Jane!
  • That I merited all I endured, I acknowledged — that I could scarcely endure more, I pleaded; and the alpha and omega of my heart’s wishes broke involuntarily from my lips in the words — ’Jane!
  • I thank Providence, who watched over you, that she then spent her fury on your wedding apparel, which perhaps brought back vague reminiscences of her own bridal days: but on what might have happened, I cannot endure to reflect.
  • …feet, flayed and swollen to lameness by the sharp air of January, began to heal and subside under the gentler breathings of April; the nights and mornings no longer by their Canadian temperature froze the very blood in our veins; we could now endure the play-hour passed in the garden: sometimes on a sunny day it began even to be pleasant and genial, and a greenness grew over those brown beds, which, freshening daily, suggested the thought that Hope traversed them at night, and left…
  • Pity, Jane, from some people is a noxious and insulting sort of tribute, which one is justified in hurling back in the teeth of those who offer it; but that is the sort of pity native to callous, selfish hearts; it is a hybrid, egotistical pain at hearing of woes, crossed with ignorant contempt for those who have endured them.
  • She heeded nothing of what I said; but when she had tasted the water and drawn breath, she went on thus — "I tell you I could not forget it; and I took my revenge: for you to be adopted by your uncle, and placed in a state of ease and comfort, was what I could not endure.

  • There are no more uses of "endure" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: endured the pain Define
to suffer through (or put up with something difficult or unpleasant)
as in: endure through the ages Define
to continue to exist
Show Multiple Meanings
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