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ire
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Jane Eyre
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ire
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • My habitual mood of humiliation, self-doubt, forlorn depression, fell damp on the embers of my decaying ire.
  • Pain, shame, ire, impatience, disgust, detestation, seemed momentarily to hold a quivering conflict in the large pupil dilating under his ebon eyebrow.
  • He had a dark face, with stern features and a heavy brow; his eyes and gathered eyebrows looked ireful and thwarted just now; he was past youth, but had not reached middle-age; perhaps he might be thirty-five.
  • I felt pain, and then I felt ire; and then I felt a determination to subdue her — to be her mistress in spite both of her nature and her will.
  • I knew the steely ire I had whetted.
  • Had I attended to the suggestions of pride and ire, I should immediately have left him; but something worked within me more strongly than those feelings could.
  • Eliza and Georgiana, evidently acting according to orders, spoke to me as little as possible: John thrust his tongue in his cheek whenever he saw me, and once attempted chastisement; but as I instantly turned against him, roused by the same sentiment of deep ire and desperate revolt which had stirred my corruption before, he thought it better to desist, and ran from me tittering execrations, and vowing I had burst his nose.

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  • She has a way of arousing his ire.
  • Beware from ire that in thy bosom sleeps,
    Geoffrey Chaucer  --  The Canterbury Tales

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