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accompany
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Jane Eyre
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accompany
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • she said I looked ill, and wished to accompany me to the sea-side.
  • At last, having held a document before her glasses for nearly five minutes, she presented it across the counter, accompanying the act by another inquisitive and mistrustful glance — it was for J.E. "Is there only one?"
  • I did; whereupon began a heaving, stamping, clattering process, accompanied by a barking and baying which removed me effectually some yards’ distance; but I would not be driven quite away till I saw the event.
  • When I saw my charmer thus come in accompanied by a cavalier, I seemed to hear a hiss, and the green snake of jealousy, rising on undulating coils from the moonlit balcony, glided within my waistcoat, and ate its way in two minutes to my heart’s core.
  • She was one of the ladies who sang: a gentleman accompanied her on the piano.
  • I asked if Georgiana would accompany her.
  • , and, accompanied by her, I quitted the lodge for the hall.
  • It was also accompanied by her that I had, nearly nine years ago, walked down the path I was now ascending.
  • Adele may accompany us, may she not, sir?
  • One day he had had company to dinner, and had sent for my portfolio; in order, doubtless, to exhibit its contents: the gentlemen went away early, to attend a public meeting at Millcote, as Mrs. Fairfax informed me; but the night being wet and inclement, Mr. Rochester did not accompany them.
  • Being pushed unceremoniously to one side — which was precisely what I wished — he usurped my place, and proceeded to accompany himself: for he could play as well as sing.
  • I really did not expect any Grace to answer; for the laugh was as tragic, as preternatural a laugh as any I ever heard; and, but that it was high noon, and that no circumstance of ghostliness accompanied the curious cachinnation; but that neither scene nor season favoured fear, I should have been superstitiously afraid.
  • "MAY it be right then," I said, as I rose, deeming it useless to continue a discourse which was all darkness to me; and, besides, sensible that the character of my interlocutor was beyond my penetration; at least, beyond its present reach; and feeling the uncertainty, the vague sense of insecurity, which accompanies a conviction of ignorance.
  • After the Easter recess, Sir George Lynn, who was lately elected member for Millcote, will have to go up to town and take his seat; I daresay Mr. Rochester will accompany him: it surprises me that he has already made so protracted a stay at Thornfield.
  • Au reste, we all know them: danger of bad example to innocence of childhood; distractions and consequent neglect of duty on the part of the attached — mutual alliance and reliance; confidence thence resulting — insolence accompanying — mutiny and general blow-up.
  • Were I not morally certain that your uncle will be dead ere you reach Madeira, I would advise you to accompany Mr. Mason back; but as it is, I think you had better remain in England till you can hear further, either from or of Mr. Eyre.
  • Yes; and when they go, I shall return to the parsonage at Morton: Hannah will accompany me; and this old house will be shut up.
  • I answered by inviting him to accompany me on a general inspection of the result of my labours.
  • As his sister, I might accompany him — not as his wife: I will tell him so.
  • I before proved to you the absurdity of a single woman of your age proposing to accompany abroad a single man of mine.
  • Deeply: he will never forgive me, I fear: yet I offered to accompany him as his sister.
  • I will not swear, reader, that there was not something of repressed sarcasm both in the tone in which I uttered this sentence, and in the feeling that accompanied it.
  • He seemed to think I had committed an impropriety in proposing to accompany him unmarried: as if I had not from the first hoped to find in him a brother, and habitually regarded him as such.
  • Georgiana added to her "How d’ye do?" several commonplaces about my journey, the weather, and so on, uttered in rather a drawling tone: and accompanied by sundry side-glances that measured me from head to foot — now traversing the folds of my drab merino pelisse, and now lingering on the plain trimming of my cottage bonnet.
  • She made such a report of me to her father, that Mr. Oliver himself accompanied her next evening — a tall, massive-featured, middle-aged, and grey-headed man, at whose side his lovely daughter looked like a bright flower near a hoary turret.
  • "I mean you to accompany me to Millcote this morning; and while you prepare for the drive, I will enlighten the old lady’s understanding.
  • "I happened to remark to Mr. Rochester how much Adele wished to be introduced to the ladies, and he said: ’Oh! let her come into the drawing-room after dinner; and request Miss Eyre to accompany her.’

  • There are no more uses of "accompany" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • The nurse accompanied the old woman everywhere.
  • The exact numbers are shown in the accompanying table.

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