To better see all uses of the word
vocation
in
Jane Eyre
please enable javascript.

Go to New Version of This Page
This old version has not been updated since 2016,
but we're leaving it in case you prefer it.
Show What's New
Please update your links from the new version.
vocation
Used In
Jane Eyre
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • "The vocation will fit you to a hair," I thought: "much good may it do you!"
  • Mr. St. John had said nothing to me yet about the employment he had promised to obtain for me; yet it became urgent that I should have a vocation of some kind.
  • "I am not fit for it: I have no vocation," I said.
  • One fitted to my purpose, you mean — fitted to my vocation.
  • What! my vocation?
  • I, who preached contentment with a humble lot, and justified the vocation even of hewers of wood and drawers of water in God’s service — I, His ordained minister, almost rave in my restlessness.
  • If even this stranger had smiled and been good-humoured to me when I addressed him; if he had put off my offer of assistance gaily and with thanks, I should have gone on my way and not felt any vocation to renew inquiries: but the frown, the roughness of the traveller, set me at my ease: I retained my station when he waved to me to go, and announced — "I cannot think of leaving you, sir, at so late an hour, in this solitary lane, till I see you are fit to mount your horse."
  • As for me, I daily wished more to please him; but to do so, I felt daily more and more that I must disown half my nature, stifle half my faculties, wrest my tastes from their original bent, force myself to the adoption of pursuits for which I had no natural vocation.

  • There are no more uses of "vocation" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • She not only changed jobs, she changed vocations.
  • Took a series of interest, aptitude, and personality tests to choose a good vocation.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading