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Jane Eyre
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Jane Eyre
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  • I would fain exercise some better faculty than that of fierce speaking; fain find nourishment for some less fiendish feeling than that of sombre indignation.
  • I drew them large; I shaped them well: the eyelashes I traced long and sombre; the irids lustrous and large.
  • And now, no more sombre thoughts: chase dull care away, Janet.
  • I gazed on it with gloom and pain: nothing soft, nothing sweet, nothing pitying, or hopeful, or subduing did it inspire; only a grating anguish for HER woes — not MY loss — and a sombre tearless dismay at the fearfulness of death in such a form.
  • Why are you so very shy, and so very sombre?
  • All the valley at my right hand was full of pasture-fields, and cornfields, and wood; and a glittering stream ran zig-zag through the varied shades of green, the mellowing grain, the sombre woodland, the clear and sunny lea.
  • Two young, graceful women — ladies in every point — sat, one in a low rocking-chair, the other on a lower stool; both wore deep mourning of crape and bombazeen, which sombre garb singularly set off very fair necks and faces: a large old pointer dog rested its massive head on the knee of one girl — in the lap of the other was cushioned a black cat.
  • Reed, when there was no company, dined early) the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further out-door exercise was now out of the question.

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  • Before she said anything, I knew it was bad news from her somber face.
  • She wore a somber black dress to the funeral.

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