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repose
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Jane Eyre
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repose -- as in: repose on the sofa
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • Resting my head on Helen’s shoulder, I put my arms round her waist; she drew me to her, and we reposed in silence.
  • I could not; though I had been on foot all day, I could not now repose an instant; I was too much excited.
  • The confidence he had thought fit to repose in me seemed a tribute to my discretion: I regarded and accepted it as such.
  • I was a mile from Thornfield, in a lane noted for wild roses in summer, for nuts and blackberries in autumn, and even now possessing a few coral treasures in hips and haws, but whose best winter delight lay in its utter solitude and leafless repose.
  • It might be two hours later, probably near eleven, when I — not having been able to fall asleep, and deeming, from the perfect silence of the dormitory, that my companions were all wrapt in profound repose — rose softly, put on my frock over my night-dress, and, without shoes, crept from the apartment, and set off in quest of Miss Temple’s room.
  • "It is always the way of events in this life," he continued presently: "no sooner have you got settled in a pleasant resting-place, than a voice calls out to you to rise and move on, for the hour of repose is expired."
  • I remember Adele clung to me as I left her: I remember I kissed her as I loosened her little hands from my neck; and I cried over her with strange emotion, and quitted her because I feared my sobs would break her still sound repose.
  • I have no relative but the universal mother, Nature: I will seek her breast and ask repose.
  • When she left me, I felt comparatively strong and revived: ere long satiety of repose and desire for action stirred me.
  • To be privileged to put my arms round what I value — to press my lips to what I love — to repose on what I trust: is that to make a sacrifice?
  • I liked the hush, the gloom, the quaintness of these retreats in the day; but I by no means coveted a night’s repose on one of those wide and heavy beds: shut in, some of them, with doors of oak; shaded, others, with wrought old English hangings crusted with thick work, portraying effigies of strange flowers, and stranger birds, and strangest human beings, — all which would have looked strange, indeed, by the pallid gleam of moonlight.
  • …and looking far down, I surveyed the grounds laid out like a map: the bright and velvet lawn closely girdling the grey base of the mansion; the field, wide as a park, dotted with its ancient timber; the wood, dun and sere, divided by a path visibly overgrown, greener with moss than the trees were with foliage; the church at the gates, the road, the tranquil hills, all reposing in the autumn day’s sun; the horizon bounded by a propitious sky, azure, marbled with pearly white.
  • "I believe you will accept the post I offer you," said he, "and hold it for a while: not permanently, though: any more than I could permanently keep the narrow and narrowing — the tranquil, hidden office of English country incumbent; for in your nature is an alloy as detrimental to repose as that in mine, though of a different kind."
  • …coloured as we see them in lovely pictures, large, and dark, and full; the long and shadowy eyelash which encircles a fine eye with so soft a fascination; the pencilled brow which gives such clearness; the white smooth forehead, which adds such repose to the livelier beauties of tint and ray; the cheek oval, fresh, and smooth; the lips, fresh too, ruddy, healthy, sweetly formed; the even and gleaming teeth without flaw; the small dimpled chin; the ornament of rich, plenteous tresses —…
  • "Don’t be alarmed," continued the strange being; "she’s a safe hand is Mrs. Poole: close and quiet; any one may repose confidence in her.
  • "Sir," I answered, "a wanderer’s repose or a sinner’s reformation should never depend on a fellow-creature.

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    Show samples from other sources
  • She was reposing on the couch
  • Good night, good night! as sweet repose and rest
    Come to thy heart as that within my breast!
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet

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