To better see all uses of the word
Jane Eyre
please enable javascript.

Used In
Jane Eyre
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • I had known what it was to come back to Gateshead when a child after a long walk, to be scolded for looking cold or gloomy; and later, what it was to come back from church to Lowood, to long for a plenteous meal and a good fire, and to be unable to get either.
  • …eyelash which encircles a fine eye with so soft a fascination; the pencilled brow which gives such clearness; the white smooth forehead, which adds such repose to the livelier beauties of tint and ray; the cheek oval, fresh, and smooth; the lips, fresh too, ruddy, healthy, sweetly formed; the even and gleaming teeth without flaw; the small dimpled chin; the ornament of rich, plenteous tresses — all advantages, in short, which, combined, realise the ideal of beauty, were fully hers.

  • There are no more uses of "plenitude" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • There was simply combined with the thought of Leslie’s imminent appearance a stirring awareness—I confess without shame—of this plenitude of money.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice
  • Back at the Barbours’, amidst the clamor and plenitude of a family that wasn’t mine, I now felt even more alone than usual—especially since, as the end of the school year neared, it wasn’t clear to me (or Andy either, for that matter) if I would be accompanying them to their summer house in Maine.
    Donna Tartt  --  The Goldfinch

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading