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philanthropy
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Jane Eyre
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philanthropy
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • ...he yet did not appear to enjoy that mental serenity, that inward content, which should be the reward of every sincere Christian and practical philanthropist.
  • You would, perhaps, think me rude if I inquired in return whether you are a philanthropist?
  • No, young lady, I am not a general philanthropist; but I bear a conscience;" and he pointed to the prominences which are said to indicate that faculty, and which, fortunately for him, were sufficiently conspicuous; giving, indeed, a marked breadth to the upper part of his head: "and, besides, I once had a kind of rude tenderness of heart.
  • Won in youth to religion, she has cultivated my original qualities thus:— From the minute germ, natural affection, she has developed the overshadowing tree, philanthropy.
  • I know not whether I am a true philanthropist; yet I am willing to aid you to the utmost of my power in a purpose so honest.
  • I need it, and I seek it so far, sir, that some true philanthropist will put me in the way of getting work which I can do, and the remuneration for which will keep me, if but in the barest necessaries of life.
  • I believe you, St. John; for I am sure you are incapable of wishing any one ill; but, as I am your kinswoman, I should desire somewhat more of affection than that sort of general philanthropy you extend to mere strangers.

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  • Her primary interests are family and philanthropy.
  • She is a philanthropist who wants to assure every child has easy access to the Internet.

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