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Jane Eyre
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Jane Eyre
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  • Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless?
  • To the Press, for the fair field its honest suffrage has opened to an obscure aspirant.
  • You — poor and obscure, and small and plain as you are — I entreat to accept me as a husband.
  • Having completed her task, she rose to draw down the blind, which she had hitherto kept up, by way, I suppose, of making the most of daylight, though dusk was now fast deepening into total obscurity.
  • Even in that obscure position, Miss Scatcherd continued to make her an object of constant notice: she was continually addressing to her such phrases as the following:— "Burns" (such it seems was her name: the girls here were all called by their surnames, as boys are elsewhere), "Burns, you are standing on the side of your shoe; turn your toes out immediately."
  • The light that long ago had struck me into syncope, recalled in this vision, seemed glidingly to mount the wall, and tremblingly to pause in the centre of the obscured ceiling.
  • Refuse to be my wife, and you limit yourself for ever to a track of selfish ease and barren obscurity.
  • He informed me then, that for some time he had fancied the obscurity clouding one eye was becoming less dense; and that now he was sure of it.
  • All was obscurity.
  • During all my first sleep, I was following the windings of an unknown road; total obscurity environed me; rain pelted me; I was burdened with the charge of a little child: a very small creature, too young and feeble to walk, and which shivered in my cold arms, and wailed piteously in my ear.
  • Probably, if I had lately left a good home and kind parents, this would have been the hour when I should most keenly have regretted the separation; that wind would then have saddened my heart; this obscure chaos would have disturbed my peace! as it was, I derived from both a strange excitement, and reckless and feverish, I wished the wind to howl more wildly, the gloom to deepen to darkness, and the confusion to rise to clamour.
  • I am obscure: Rivers is an old name; but of the three sole descendants of the race, two earn the dependant’s crust among strangers, and the third considers himself an alien from his native country — not only for life, but in death.
  • According as the shifting obscurity and flickering gleam hovered here or glanced there, it was now the bearded physician, Luke, that bent his brow; now St. John’s long hair that waved; and anon the devilish face of Judas, that grew out of the panel, and seemed gathering life and threatening a revelation of the arch-traitor — of Satan himself — in his subordinate’s form.
  • This scene was as silent as if all the figures had been shadows and the firelit apartment a picture: so hushed was it, I could hear the cinders fall from the grate, the clock tick in its obscure corner; and I even fancied I could distinguish the click-click of the woman’s knitting-needles.
  • He resumed — "And since I am myself poor and obscure, I can offer you but a service of poverty and obscurity.
  • He resumed — "And since I am myself poor and obscure, I can offer you but a service of poverty and obscurity.

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  • The obscure battle is hardly mentioned in history books.
  • Nobody had seen the poem before, but an Internet search proved she had copied an obscure poem written in 1920.

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