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malignant
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Jane Eyre
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malignant
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • He was moody, too; unaccountably so; I more than once, when sent for to read to him, found him sitting in his library alone, with his head bent on his folded arms; and, when he looked up, a morose, almost a malignant, scowl blackened his features.
  • The idea struck me that if she discovered I knew or suspected her guilt, she would be playing of some of her malignant pranks on me; I thought it advisable to be on my guard.
  • The lunatic is both cunning and malignant; she has never failed to take advantage of her guardian’s temporary lapses; once to secrete the knife with which she stabbed her brother, and twice to possess herself of the key of her cell, and issue therefrom in the night-time.
  • "Thank God!" he exclaimed, "that if anything malignant did come near you last night, it was only the veil that was harmed.

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  • Gey and his wife, Margaret, had spent the last three decades working to grow malignant cells outside the body, hoping to use them to find cancer’s cause and cure.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • He hit it [the shark] without hope but with resolution and complete malignancy.
    Ernest Hemingway  --  The Old Man and the Sea

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