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indifferent
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Jane Eyre
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indifferent
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • "I have not considered the subject," said he indifferently, looking straight before him.
  • I found the mess to consist of indifferent potatoes and strange shreds of rusty meat, mixed and cooked together.
  • But I won’t allow that, seeing that it would never suit my case, as I have made an indifferent, not to say a bad, use of both advantages.
  • All John Reed’s violent tyrannies, all his sisters’ proud indifference, all his mother’s aversion, all the servants’ partiality, turned up in my disturbed mind like a dark deposit in a turbid well.
  • I watched it ascending the drive with indifference; carriages often came to Gateshead, but none ever brought visitors in whom I was interested; it stopped in front of the house, the door-bell rang loudly, the new-comer was admitted.
  • She paused, and then added, with a sort of assumed indifference, but still in a marked and significant tone — "But you are young, Miss; and I should say a light sleeper: perhaps you may have heard a noise?"
  • I remember her as a slim young woman, with black hair, dark eyes, very nice features, and good, clear complexion; but she had a capricious and hasty temper, and indifferent ideas of principle or justice: still, such as she was, I preferred her to any one else at Gateshead Hall.
  • I smiled at Bessie’s frank answer: I felt that it was correct, but I confess I was not quite indifferent to its import: at eighteen most people wish to please, and the conviction that they have not an exterior likely to second that desire brings anything but gratification.
  • This was said with a careless, abstracted indifference, which showed that my solicitude was, at least in his opinion, wholly superfluous.
  • By degrees, he acquired a certain influence over me that took away my liberty of mind: his praise and notice were more restraining than his indifference.
  • She had obviously not heard anything to her advantage: and it seemed to me, from her prolonged fit of gloom and taciturnity, that she herself, notwithstanding her professed indifference, attached undue importance to whatever revelations had been made her.
  • I am sure most people would have thought him an ugly man; yet there was so much unconscious pride in his port; so much ease in his demeanour; such a look of complete indifference to his own external appearance; so haughty a reliance on the power of other qualities, intrinsic or adventitious, to atone for the lack of mere personal attractiveness, that, in looking at him, one inevitably shared the indifference, and, even in a blind, imperfect sense, put faith in the confidence.
  • I am sure most people would have thought him an ugly man; yet there was so much unconscious pride in his port; so much ease in his demeanour; such a look of complete indifference to his own external appearance; so haughty a reliance on the power of other qualities, intrinsic or adventitious, to atone for the lack of mere personal attractiveness, that, in looking at him, one inevitably shared the indifference, and, even in a blind, imperfect sense, put faith in the confidence.

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  • About a third are in favor of the change, a third are opposed, and a third are indifferent.
  • Before meeting us, she felt alone in an indifferent world.

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