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imperious
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Jane Eyre
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imperious
Used In
Jane Eyre
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  • I felt at times as if he were my relation rather than my master: yet he was imperious sometimes still; but I did not mind that; I saw it was his way.
  • The well-known face was there: stern, relentless as ever — there was that peculiar eye which nothing could melt, and the somewhat raised, imperious, despotic eyebrow.
  • "Answer me — speak again!" he ordered, imperiously and aloud.
  • I had learnt to love Mr. Rochester: I could not unlove him now, merely because I found that he had ceased to notice me — because I might pass hours in his presence, and he would never once turn his eyes in my direction — because I saw all his attentions appropriated by a great lady, who scorned to touch me with the hem of her robes as she passed; who, if ever her dark and imperious eye fell on me by chance, would withdraw it instantly as from an object too mean to merit observation.

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  • She dismissed the matter with an imperious wave of her hand.
  • People don’t generally warm to her. She comes across as imperious.

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