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Jane Eyre
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Jane Eyre
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  • You — poor and obscure, and small and plain as you are — I entreat to accept me as a husband.
  • By dint of entreaties expressed in energetic whispers, I reduced the half-dozen to two: these however, he vowed he would select himself.
  • He would send for the baby; though I entreated him rather to put it out to nurse and pay for its maintenance.
  • Soon I heard him earnestly entreating me to be composed.
  • "Ask me something now, Jane, — the least thing: I desire to be entreated — " "Indeed I will, sir; I have my petition all ready."
  • "Ask something more," he said presently; "it is my delight to be entreated, and to yield."
  • "Let her come to me," I entreated: "she will, perhaps, trouble you, sir: there is plenty of room on this side."
  • No sooner had twilight, that hour of romance, began to lower her blue and starry banner over the lattice, than I rose, opened the piano, and entreated him, for the love of heaven, to give me a song.
  • I then wrote to Mrs. Fairfax, entreating information on the subject.
  • I wished to leave immediately after the funeral, but Georgiana entreated me to stay till she could get off to London, whither she was now at last invited by her uncle, Mr. Gibson, who had come down to direct his sister’s interment and settle the family affairs.
  • "But I cannot persuade her to go away, my lady," said the footman; "nor can any of the servants: Mrs. Fairfax is with her just now, entreating her to be gone; but she has taken a chair in the chimneycomer, and says nothing shall stir her from it till she gets leave to come in here."
  • I humbly entreat my Redeemer to give me strength to lead henceforth a purer life than I have done hitherto!
  • I entreated of Heaven.
  • The water stood in my eyes to hear this avowal of his dependence; just as if a royal eagle, chained to a perch, should be forced to entreat a sparrow to become its purveyor.
  • I thought, sir, that you were on the road a long way before me; and I strained every nerve to overtake you, and made effort on effort to utter your name and entreat you to stop — but my movements were fettered, and my voice still died away inarticulate; while you, I felt, withdrew farther and farther every moment.
  • I had entreated him to keep quite clear of the house till everything was arranged: and, indeed, the bare idea of the commotion, at once sordid and trivial, going on within its walls sufficed to scare him to estrangement.
  • — when a long way must yet be measured by my weary, trembling limbs before I could reach human habitation — when cold charity must be entreated before I could get a lodging: reluctant sympathy importuned, almost certain repulse incurred, before my tale could be listened to, or one of my wants relieved!
  • Don’t you think I had better take advantage of the confession, and begin and coax and entreat — even cry and be sulky if necessary — for the sake of a mere essay of my power?"
  • "It remains for me, then," he said, "to remember you in my prayers, and to entreat God for you, in all earnestness, that you may not indeed become a castaway.

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  • She flattered and entreated him until he agreed to help.
  • She was unmoved by his entreaties.

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