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Jane Eyre
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Jane Eyre
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  • I asked, with awkward diffidence.
  • "What affectation of diffidence was this at first?" they might have demanded; "what stupid regardlessness now?"
  • There was an unceremonious directness, a searching, decided steadfastness in his gaze now, which told that intention, and not diffidence, had hitherto kept it averted from the stranger.
  • Rivers," I said, turning to him, and looking at him, as he looked at me, openly and without diffidence, "you and your sisters have done me a great service — the greatest man can do his fellowbeing; you have rescued me, by your noble hospitality, from death.
  • Your garb and manner were restricted by rule; your air was often diffident, and altogether that of one refined by nature, but absolutely unused to society, and a good deal afraid of making herself disadvantageously conspicuous by some solecism or blunder; yet when addressed, you lifted a keen, a daring, and a glowing eye to your interlocutor’s face: there was penetration and power in each glance you gave; when plied by close questions, you found ready and round answers.

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  • She is diffident around adults, but dominant with her peer group.
  • At first, he could give no encouragement; with unfeigned diffidence, he expressed his conviction that he was not adequate to the performance of so great a task;
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

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