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Jane Eyre
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Jane Eyre
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  • "Sir, you have now given me my ’cadeau;’ I am obliged to you: it is the meed teachers most covet — praise of their pupils’ progress."
  • Nothing ever rode the Gytrash: it was always alone; and goblins, to my notions, though they might tenant the dumb carcasses of beasts, could scarce covet shelter in the commonplace human form.
  • I coveted a cake of bread.
  • He continued to gaze at the picture: the longer he looked, the firmer he held it, the more he seemed to covet it.
  • I liked the hush, the gloom, the quaintness of these retreats in the day; but I by no means coveted a night’s repose on one of those wide and heavy beds: shut in, some of them, with doors of oak; shaded, others, with wrought old English hangings crusted with thick work, portraying effigies of strange flowers, and stranger birds, and strangest human beings, — all which would have looked strange, indeed, by the pallid gleam of moonlight.

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  • The company makes knockoffs for people who covet designer fashions, but can’t afford them.
  • He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it - namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

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