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Jane Eyre
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Jane Eyre
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  • she had a capricious and hasty temper
  • Yet are you not capricious, sir?
  • I have suffered a martyrdom from their incompetency and caprice.
  • He said I was a capricious witch, and that he would rather sing another time; but I averred that no time was like the present.
  • A reception of finished politeness would probably have confused me: I could not have returned or repaid it by answering grace and elegance on my part; but harsh caprice laid me under no obligation; on the contrary, a decent quiescence, under the freak of manner, gave me the advantage.
  • What if a former caprice (a freak very possible to a nature so sudden and headstrong as his) has delivered him into her power, and she now exercises over his actions a secret influence, the result of his own indiscretion, which he cannot shake off, and dare not disregard?
  • She had taken an amiable caprice to me.
  • For a little while you will perhaps be as you are now, — a very little while; and then you will turn cool; and then you will be capricious; and then you will be stern, and I shall have much ado to please you: but when you get well used to me, you will perhaps like me again, — LIKE me, I say, not LOVE me.
  • I used to enjoy a chance meeting with you, Jane, at this time: there was a curious hesitation in your manner: you glanced at me with a slight trouble — a hovering doubt: you did not know what my caprice might be — whether I was going to play the master and be stern, or the friend and be benignant.
  • You will see what impetus would be given to your efforts and mine by our physical and mental union in marriage: the only union that gives a character of permanent conformity to the destinies and designs of human beings; and, passing over all minor caprices — all trivial difficulties and delicacies of feeling — all scruple about the degree, kind, strength or tenderness of mere personal inclination — you will hasten to enter into that union at once.

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  • Nothing seems more capricious than a tornado.
  • The court overturned the ruling—describing it as having been made in a capricious manner.

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