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Jane Eyre
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Jane Eyre
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  • When full of flowers they would doubtless look pretty; but now, at the latter end of January, all was wintry blight and brown decay.
  • The more you and I converse, the better; for while I cannot blight you, you may refresh me.
  • Oh, never more could it turn to him; for faith was blighted — confidence destroyed!
  • Contempt fell cool on Mr. Rochester — his passion died as if a blight had shrivelled it up: he only asked — "What have YOU to say?"
  • I wish to foster, not to blight — to earn gratitude, not to wring tears of blood — no, nor of brine: my harvest must be in smiles, in endearments, in sweet — That will do.
  • Bitter and base associations have become the sole food of your memory: you wander here and there, seeking rest in exile: happiness in pleasure — I mean in heartless, sensual pleasure — such as dulls intellect and blights feeling.
  • That woman, who has so abused your long-suffering, so sullied your name, so outraged your honour, so blighted your youth, is not your wife, nor are you her husband.
  • His form was of the same strong and stalwart contour as ever: his port was still erect, his hair was still raven black; nor were his features altered or sunk: not in one year’s space, by any sorrow, could his athletic strength be quelled or his vigorous prime blighted.
  • There would be recesses in my mind which would be only mine, to which he never came, and sentiments growing there fresh and sheltered which his austerity could never blight, nor his measured warrior-march trample down: but as his wife — at his side always, and always restrained, and always checked — forced to keep the fire of my nature continually low, to compel it to burn inwardly and never utter a cry, though the imprisoned flame consumed vital after vital — THIS would be…

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  • The once thriving downtown has become an example of urban blight with abandoned buildings and too much crime.
  • Too much rain may blight the garden with mold

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