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Moby Dick
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Moby Dick
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  • The landlord was near spraining his wrist, and I told him for heaven’s sake to quit—the bed was soft enough to suit me, and I did not know how all the planing in the world could make eider down of a pine plank.
  • An oarsman sprains his wrist: the carpenter concocts a soothing lotion.
  • It came to pass, that in the ambergris affair Stubb’s after-oarsman chanced so to sprain his hand, as for a time to become quite maimed; and, temporarily, Pip was put into his place.
  • But at length, such calamities did ensue in these assaults—not restricted to sprained wrists and ankles, broken limbs, or devouring amputations—but fatal to the last degree of fatality; those repeated disastrous repulses, all accumulating and piling their terrors upon Moby Dick; those things had gone far to shake the fortitude of many brave hunters, to whom the story of the White Whale had eventually come.
  • Some sprained shoulders, wrists, and ankles; livid contusions; wrenched harpoons and lances; inextricable intricacies of rope; shattered oars and planks; all these were there; but no fatal or even serious ill seemed to have befallen any one.
  • " ’My wrist is sprained with ye!’ he cried, at last; ’but there is still rope enough left for you, my fine bantam, that wouldn’t give up.

  • There are no more uses of "sprain" in the book.

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  • She sprained her ankle.
  • He rubbed his arms; nothing seemed to be shattered or even sprained all that badly.
    Gary Paulsen  --  Hatchet

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