To better see all uses of the word
Moby Dick
please enable javascript.

Used In
Moby Dick
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • How it was that they so aboundingly responded to the old man’s ire—by what evil magic their souls were possessed, that at times his hate seemed almost theirs; the White Whale as much their insufferable foe as his; how all this came to be—what the White Whale was to them, or how to their unconscious understandings, also, in some dim, unsuspected way, he might have seemed the gliding great demon of the seas of life,—all this to explain, would be to dive deeper than Ishmael can go.
  • …he sat still for a moment, and as he steadfastly looked into the mate’s malignant eye and perceived the stacks of powder-casks heaped up in him and the slow-match silently burning along towards them; as he instinctively saw all this, that strange forbearance and unwillingness to stir up the deeper passionateness in any already ireful being—a repugnance most felt, when felt at all, by really valiant men even when aggrieved—this nameless phantom feeling, gentlemen, stole over Steelkilt.

  • There are no more uses of "ire" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • She has a way of arousing his ire.
  • Beware from ire that in thy bosom sleeps,
    Geoffrey Chaucer  --  The Canterbury Tales

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading