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Moby Dick
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Moby Dick
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  • And besides, when a man is elevated in that odd fashion, he has no proper foundation for his superior altitude.
  • With the problem of the universe revolving in me, how could I—being left completely to myself at such a thought-engendering altitude—how could I but lightly hold my obligations to observe all whale-ships’ standing orders, "Keep your weather eye open, and sing out every time."
  • It looks like a real live leg, filed down to nothing but the core; he’ll be standing on this to-morrow; he’ll be taking altitudes on it.
  • Second: To the native Indian of Peru, the continual sight of the snowhowdahed Andes conveys naught of dread, except, perhaps, in the mere fancying of the eternal frosted desolateness reigning at such vast altitudes, and the natural conceit of what a fearfulness it would be to lose oneself in such inhuman solitudes.
  • From their arrow-slit in the skull, the priests perceived me taking the altitude of the final rib, "How now!" they shouted; "Dar’st thou measure this our god!

  • There are no more uses of "altitude" in the book.

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  • The altitude gave her a headache.
  • Denver is called the Mile High City because of its altitude (1 mile above sea level).

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