To better see all uses of the word
impulsive
in
Moby Dick
please enable javascript.

impulsive
Used In
Moby Dick
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • "Sing out for him!" was the impulsive rejoinder from a score of clubbed voices.
  • Having impulsively, it is probable, and perhaps somewhat prematurely revealed the prime but private purpose of the Pequod’s voyage, Ahab was now entirely conscious that, in so doing, he had indirectly laid himself open to the unanswerable charge of usurpation; and with perfect impunity, both moral and legal, his crew if so disposed, and to that end competent, could refuse all further obedience to him, and even violently wrest from him the command.
  • Meantime, Queequeg’s impulsive, indifferent sword, sometimes hitting the woof slantingly, or crookedly, or strongly, or weakly, as the case might be; and by this difference in the concluding blow producing a corresponding contrast in the final aspect of the completed fabric; this savage’s sword, thought I, which thus finally shapes and fashions both warp and woof; this easy, indifferent sword must be chance—aye, chance, free will, and necessity—nowise incompatible—all interweavingly…

  • There are no more uses of "impulsive" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • letting him borrow her car was an impulsive act that she immediately regretted
  • He is young and impulsive.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading