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imminent
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Moby Dick
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imminent
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Moby Dick
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  • A happy-go-lucky; neither craven nor valiant; taking perils as they came with an indifferent air; and while engaged in the most imminent crisis of the chase, toiling away, calm and collected as a journeyman joiner engaged for the year.
  • His greatest admirer could not have cordially justified his bringing his harpoon into breakfast with him, and using it there without ceremony; reaching over the table with it, to the imminent jeopardy of many heads, and grappling the beefsteaks towards him.
  • We were thus placed in the most imminent danger, as this gigantic creature, setting up its back, raised the ship three feet at least out of the water.
  • Again, if the dart be successful, then at the second critical instant, that is, when the whale starts to run, the boatheader and harpooneer likewise start to running fore and aft, to the imminent jeopardy of themselves and every one else.
  • Though not one of the oarsmen was then facing the life and death peril so close to them ahead, yet with their eyes on the intense countenance of the mate in the stern of the boat, they knew that the imminent instant had come; they heard, too, an enormous wallowing sound as of fifty elephants stirring in their litter.

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  • Authorities warned of imminent danger of flooding.
  • You have defended me from imminent death.
    Shakespeare, William  --  King Henry VI, Part 2

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