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dubious
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Moby Dick
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dubious
Used In
Moby Dick
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  • "Those sailors we saw, Queequeg, where can they have gone to?" said I, looking dubiously at the sleeper.
  • It was a very dubious-looking, nay, a very dark and dismal night, bitingly cold and cheerless.
  • Whether to admit Hercules among us or not, concerning this I long remained dubious: for though according to the Greek mythologies, that antique Crockett and Kit Carson—that brawny doer of rejoicing good deeds, was swallowed down and thrown up by a whale; still, whether that strictly makes a whaleman of him, that might be mooted.
  • Such an added, gliding strangeness began to invest the thin Fedallah now; such ceaseless shudderings shook him; that the men looked dubious at him; half uncertain, as it seemed, whether indeed he were a mortal substance, or else a tremulous shadow cast upon the deck by some unseen being’s body.

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  • She was dubious, but agreed to come with us anyway.
  • She has a dubious reputation. I wouldn’t count on her.

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