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Moby Dick
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Moby Dick
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  • I told him, too, that he being in other things such an extremely sensible and sagacious savage, it pained me, very badly pained me, to see him now so deplorably foolish about this ridiculous Ramadan of his.
  • Concerning all this, it is much to be deplored that the mast-heads of a southern whale ship are unprovided with those enviable little tents or pulpits, called CROW’S-NESTS, in which the look-outs of a Greenland whaler are protected from the inclement weather of the frozen seas.
  • The more I consider this mighty tail, the more do I deplore my inability to express it.
  • And it is much to be deplored that the place to which you devote so considerable a portion of the whole term of your natural life, should be so sadly destitute of anything approaching to a cosy inhabitiveness, or adapted to breed a comfortable localness of feeling, such as pertains to a bed, a hammock, a hearse, a sentry box, a pulpit, a coach, or any other of those small and snug contrivances in which men temporarily isolate themselves.

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  • We deplore the government’s treatment of political prisoners.
  • I deplore this hostile action

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