To better see all uses of the word
Moby Dick
please enable javascript.

Used In
Moby Dick
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Struck by his desperate dauntlessness, and his wild desire to visit Christendom, the captain at last relented, and told him he might make himself at home.
  • In Saint Stylites, the famous Christian hermit of old times, who built him a lofty stone pillar in the desert and spent the whole latter portion of his life on its summit, hoisting his food from the ground with a tackle; in him we have a remarkable instance of a dauntless stander-of-mast-heads; who was not to be driven from his place by fogs or frosts, rain, hail, or sleet; but valiantly facing everything out to the last, literally died at his post.
  • But not a bit daunted, Queequeg steered us manfully; now sheering off from this monster directly across our route in advance; now edging away from that, whose colossal flukes were suspended overhead, while all the time, Starbuck stood up in the bows, lance in hand, pricking out of our way whatever whales he could reach by short darts, for there was no time to make long ones.

  • There are no more uses of "daunt" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • It is a challenge that would daunt a lesser diplomat.
  • Obstacles don’t daunt her.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading