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A Tale of Two Cities
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A Tale of Two Cities
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unspecified meaning
  • The trade signs (and they were almost as many as the shops) were, all, grim illustrations of Want.
  • Altogether, the Old Bailey, at that date, was a choice illustration of the precept, that "Whatever is is right;" an aphorism that would be as final as it is lazy, did it not include the troublesome consequence, that nothing that ever was, was wrong.

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  • The fashion of the last Louis but one, of the line that was never to break —the fourteenth Louis—was conspicuous in their rich furniture; but, it was diversified by many objects that were illustrations of old pages in the history of France.
  • We will say, to put a case and for the sake of illustration, that he had been used, in his bad time, to work at a little forge.
  • He looked like his illustration, as he raised his eyes to Mr. Lorry’s face.
  • But, Mr. Stryver replied to my Lord, no; but he would ask the witness to tell him whether what happened once, might happen twice; whether he would have been so confident if he had seen this illustration of his rashness sooner, whether he would be so confident, having seen it; and more.

  • There are no more uses of "illustrate" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: as illustrated by this example Define
to help make clear -- typically by example
as in: an illustrated children's book Define
to draw pictures (or provide photographs) to accompany a book or other writing
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