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A Tale of Two Cities
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A Tale of Two Cities
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as in: vengeance is mine Define
the act of taking revenge (Revenge means to harm someone to get them back for something harmful that they have done.)
  • Vengeance and retribution require a long time; it is the rule.
  • "Hark!" said The Vengeance.

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  • The Vengeance stooped, and the jar of a drum was heard as she moved it at her feet behind the counter.
  • The Defarges, husband and wife, The Vengeance, and Jacques Three, were in the first press, and at no great distance from him in the Hall.
  • Saint Antoine slept, the Defarges slept: even The Vengeance slept with her starved grocer, and the drum was at rest.
  • The remorseless sea of turbulently swaying shapes, voices of vengeance, and faces hardened in the furnaces of suffering until the touch of pity could make no mark on them.
  • The short, rather plump wife of a starved grocer, and the mother of two children withal, this lieutenant had already earned the complimentary name of The Vengeance.
  • The dead man disposed of, and the crowd being under the necessity of providing some other entertainment for itself, another brighter genius (or perhaps the same) conceived the humour of impeaching casual passers-by, as Old Bailey spies, and wreaking vengeance on them.
  • The Vengeance, as custodian of the drum, could have wakened him up and had the same speech out of him as before the Bastille fell, or old Foulon was seized; not so with the hoarse tones of the men and women in Saint Antoine’s bosom.
  • Both the women followed; the second woman being The Vengeance.

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  • "We have seen nothing else," returned The Vengeance.
  • It was The Vengeance who, amidst the warm commendations of the audience, thus assisted the proceedings.
  • The President rang his bell; but, The Vengeance, warming with encouragement, shrieked, "I defy that bell!" wherein she was likewise much commended.
  • "Much influence around him, has that Doctor?" murmured Madame Defarge, smiling to The Vengeance.
  • The Vengeance assisted in the conversation, like a regular member of the establishment.
  • The Vengeance, also, highly approved.
  • "She is an Angel!" said The Vengeance, and embraced her.
  • "There is no better," the voluble Vengeance protested in her shrill notes, "in France."
  • The Vengeance and Jacques Three vied with each other in their fervent protestations that she was the most admirable and marvellous of witnesses.
  • "Ah, my cherished!" cried The Vengeance; and embraced her.
  • "I willingly obey the orders of my Chief," said The Vengeance with alacrity, and kissing her cheek.
  • The Vengeance and the Juryman, looking after her as she walked away, were highly appreciative of her fine figure, and her superb moral endowments.
  • On one of the fore-most chairs, stands The Vengeance, looking about for her friend.
  • "No; nor will she miss now," cries The Vengeance, petulantly.
  • Louder, Vengeance, much louder, and still she will scarcely hear thee.
  • Louder yet, Vengeance, with a little oath or so added, and yet it will hardly bring her.
  • As The Vengeance descends from her elevation to do it, the tumbrils begin to discharge their loads.
  • The Vengeance followed.
  • A moment afterwards, and a throng of people came pouring round the corner by the prison wall, in the midst of whom was the wood-sawyer hand in hand with The Vengeance.
  • In that same juncture of time when the Fifty-Two awaited their fate Madame Defarge held darkly ominous council with The Vengeance and Jacques Three of the Revolutionary Jury.
  • There could have been no such Revolution, if all laws, forms, and ceremonies, had not first been so monstrously abused, that the suicidal vengeance of the Revolution was to scatter them all to the winds.
  • Instantly Madame Defarge’s knife was in her girdle; the drum was beating in the streets, as if it and a drummer had flown together by magic; and The Vengeance, uttering terrific shrieks, and flinging her arms about her head like all the forty Furies at once, was tearing from house to house, rousing the women.
  • (There was a time in my imprisonment, when my desire for vengeance was unbearable.
  • The amiable Vengeance added, with a laugh, "Yes, my faith!
  • "See you then, Jacques," said Madame Defarge, wrathfully; "and see you, too, my little Vengeance; see you both!
  • "Peace, little Vengeance," said Madame Defarge, laying her hand with a slight frown on her lieutenant’s lips, "hear me speak.
  • Be sure you are there, my soul," said The Vengeance, calling after her, for she had already turned into the street, "before the tumbrils arrive!"
  • "Bad Fortune!" cries The Vengeance, stamping her foot in the chair, "and here are the tumbrils!
  • Madame Defarge beckoned the Juryman and The Vengeance a little nearer to the door, and there expounded her further views to them thus: "She will now be at home, awaiting the moment of his death.
  • Madame Defarge looked, coldly as ever, at the suppliant, and said, turning to her friend The Vengeance: "The wives and mothers we have been used to see, since we were as little as this child, and much less, have not been greatly considered?
  • The lady in question, whose rooted conviction that she was more than a match for any foreigner, was not to be shaken by distress and, danger, appeared with folded arms, and observed in English to The Vengeance, whom her eyes first encountered, "Well, I am sure, Boldface!
  • Defarge had but sprung over a railing and a table, and folded the miserable wretch in a deadly embrace—Madame Defarge had but followed and turned her hand in one of the ropes with which he was tied—The Vengeance and Jacques Three were not yet up with them, and the men at the windows had not yet swooped into the Hall, like birds of prey from their high perches—when the cry seemed to go up, all over the city, "Bring him out!
  • If he had given any utterance to his, and they were prophetic, they would have been these: "I see Barsad, and Cly, Defarge, The Vengeance, the Juryman, the Judge, long ranks of the new oppressors who have risen on the destruction of the old, perishing by this retributive instrument, before it shall cease out of its present use.

  • There are no more uses of "vengeance" identified with this meaning in the book.

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  • Most Americans wanted vengeance after the 9-11 attacks.
  • Her evolutionary benefit theory of vengeance is supported by studies showing that a person’s desire for revenge increases when others see their mistreatment.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: vengeance is mine Define
the act of taking revenge (Revenge means to harm someone to get them back for something harmful that they have done.)
as in: with a vengeance Define
with intensity
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