To better see all uses of the word
A Tale of Two Cities
please enable javascript.

Used In
A Tale of Two Cities
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • From this room, many such dogs have been taken out to be hanged; in the next room (my bedroom), one fellow, to our knowledge, was poniarded on the spot for professing some insolent delicacy respecting his daughter—_his_ daughter?
  • XII The Fellow of Delicacy.

  • Show more
  • XIII The Fellow of No Delicacy.
  • If you had been a fellow of any sensitiveness or delicacy of feeling in that kind of way, Sydney, I might have been a little resentful of your employing such a designation; but you are not.
  • Mr. Stryver, a man of little more than thirty, but looking twenty years older than he was, stout, loud, red, bluff, and free from any drawback of delicacy, had a pushing way of shouldering himself (morally and physically) into companies and conversations, that argued well for his shouldering his way up in life.
  • No man ever really loved a woman, lost her, and knew her with a blameless though an unchanged mind, when she was a wife and a mother, but her children had a strange sympathy with him—an instinctive delicacy of pity for him.
  • For a moment, he held the fair face from him to look at the well-remembered expression on the forehead, and then laid the bright golden hair against his little brown wig, with a genuine tenderness and delicacy which, if such things be old-fashioned, were as old as Adam.
  • On a day in August, when Mr. Stryver (after notifying to his jackal that "he had thought better of that marrying matter") had carried his delicacy into Devonshire, and when the sight and scent of flowers in the City streets had some waifs of goodness in them for the worst, of health for the sickliest, and of youth for the oldest, Sydney’s feet still trod those stones.
  • It was the popular theme for jests; it was the best cure for headache, it infallibly prevented the hair from turning grey, it imparted a peculiar delicacy to the complexion, it was the National Razor which shaved close: who kissed La Guillotine, looked through the little window and sneezed into the sack.
  • Citizen Gabelle hinted, with infinite delicacy and politeness, that in the pressure of business imposed on the Tribunal by the multitude of enemies of the Republic with which it had to deal, he had been slightly overlooked in his prison of the Abbaye—in fact, had rather passed out of the Tribunal’s patriotic remembrance—until three days ago; when he had been summoned before it, and had been set at liberty on the Jury’s declaring themselves satisfied that the accusation against him was…

  • There are no more uses of "delicacy" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: eat the delicacy Define
something that is rare or expensive -- usually a prized food
as in: discuss with delicacy Define
care and gentleness -- especially speaking or acting with sensitivity and tact
as in: offend her delicacy Define
fragility -- of something that can easily be damaged (often referring to the fragility of someone's emotional well being when it is easily distressed by something that is offensive or disturbing)
as in: delicacy of the brushwork Define
pleasant subtlety or fineness
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading