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apprehension
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Pride and Prejudice
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apprehension
Used In
Pride and Prejudice
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unspecified meaning
  • The younger girls formed hopes of coming out a year or two sooner than they might otherwise have done; and the boys were relieved from their apprehension of Charlotte’s dying an old maid.
  • He spoke of apprehension and anxiety, but his countenance expressed real security.

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  • But it was not till the evening of the dance at Netherfield that I had any apprehension of his feeling a serious attachment.
  • Astonishment, apprehension, and even horror, oppressed her.
  • They descended the hill, crossed the bridge, and drove to the door; and, while examining the nearer aspect of the house, all her apprehension of meeting its owner returned.
  • With the kindest concern he came on to Longbourn, and broke his apprehensions to us in a manner most creditable to his heart.
  • Such formidable accounts of her ladyship, and her manner of living, quite frightened Maria Lucas who had been little used to company, and she looked forward to her introduction at Rosings with as much apprehension as her father had done to his presentation at St. James’s.
  • Mrs. Collins, seeing that she was really unwell, did not press her to go and as much as possible prevented her husband from pressing her; but Mr. Collins could not conceal his apprehension of Lady Catherine’s being rather displeased by her staying at home.
  • Had they no apprehension of anything before the elopement took place?
  • As to what restraint the apprehensions of disgrace in the corps might throw on a dishonourable elopement with her, I am not able to judge; for I know nothing of the effects that such a step might produce.

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  • As she had heard no carriage, she thought it not unlikely to be Lady Catherine, and under that apprehension was putting away her half-finished letter that she might escape all impertinent questions, when the door opened, and, to her very great surprise, Mr. Darcy, and Mr. Darcy only, entered the room.
  • He was coming to us, in order to assure us of his concern, before he had any idea of their not being gone to Scotland: when that apprehension first got abroad, it hastened his journey.
  • …good understanding to the efforts of his aunt, who did call on him in her return through London, and there relate her journey to Longbourn, its motive, and the substance of her conversation with Elizabeth; dwelling emphatically on every expression of the latter which, in her ladyship’s apprehension, peculiarly denoted her perverseness and assurance; in the belief that such a relation must assist her endeavours to obtain that promise from her nephew which she had refused to give.
  • It was dated from Rosings, at eight o’clock in the morning, and was as follows:— "Be not alarmed, madam, on receiving this letter, by the apprehension of its containing any repetition of those sentiments or renewal of those offers which were last night so disgusting to you.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: apprehension about finals Define
worry about what is to come
as in: apprehension of the criminal Define
the capture of a criminal
as in: conscious apprehension is limited Define
to understand or: in psychology and philosophy: immediate awareness prior to analysis and judgment
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