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A Tale of Two Cities
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A Tale of Two Cities
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  • The words were still in his hearing as just spoken—distinctly in his hearing as ever spoken words had been in his life—when the weary passenger started to the consciousness of daylight, and found that the shadows of the night were gone.
  • He was in his usual morning dress, and his face (which Mr. Lorry could distinctly see), though still very pale, was calmly studious and attentive.
  • "Now, did you ever see him," asked the Doctor, distinctly and collectedly, though in the same low voice, "engaged in that pursuit originally?"
  • She never abated the piercing quality of her shrieks, never stumbled in the distinctness or the order of her words.
  • Of unjust treatment in detention and hardship, and in cruel separation from his wife and child, he foreshadowed the likelihood, or the certainty; but, beyond this, he dreaded nothing distinctly.
  • She said, in a low, distinct, awe-stricken voice, as if she were saying it in a dream, "I am going to see his Ghost!
  • But, the suppressed manner had enough of menace in it—not visible and presented, but indistinct and withheld—to alarm Lucie into saying, as she laid her appealing hand on Madame Defarge’s dress: "You will be good to my poor husband.

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  • Martinez and his colleagues identified 21 distinct emotions made by the human face.
  • Two distinct brain networks guide our judgments.

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