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deference
in
A Tale of Two Cities
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deference
Used In
A Tale of Two Cities
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  • with less internal deference than he made an outward show of
  • "There is not," pursued the nephew, in his former tone, "a face I can look at, in all this country round about us, which looks at me with any deference on it but the dark deference of fear and slavery."
  • "There is not," pursued the nephew, in his former tone, "a face I can look at, in all this country round about us, which looks at me with any deference on it but the dark deference of fear and slavery."
  • "It is a tone of fervent admiration, true homage, and deep love, Doctor Manette!" he said deferentially.
  • The dark deference of fear and slavery, my friend," observed the Marquis, "will keep the dogs obedient to the whip, as long as this roof," looking up to it, "shuts out the sky."

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  • They changed their strategy in deference to the President’s wishes.
  • Out of deference for the Hindu visitors, they did not serve beef.

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