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republic
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A Tale of Two Cities
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republic
Used In
A Tale of Two Cities
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  • Republic One and Indivisible.
  • An enemy to the Republic!
  • Was that criminal in the eyes of the Republic?
  • Five were to be tried together, next, as enemies of the Republic, forasmuch as they had not assisted it by word or deed.
  • The first of them told him so, with the customary prison sign of Death—a raised finger—and they all added in words, "Long live the Republic!"
  • You are again the prisoner of the Republic.
  • If the Republic demands sacrifices from you, without doubt you as a good patriot will be happy to make them.
  • The Republic goes before all.
  • A plot in the prisons, of the foreigner against the Republic.
  • As to what is dearer to you than life, nothing can be so dear to a good citizen as the Republic.
  • If the Republic should demand of you the sacrifice of your child herself, you would have no duty but to sacrifice her.
  • At heart and by descent an Aristocrat, an enemy of the Republic, a notorious oppressor of the People.
  • I have observed his face to be not the face of a true friend of the Republic.
  • It is represented that he is not in strong health, and has separated sadly from a friend who is under the displeasure of the Republic.
  • Many are under the displeasure of the Republic, and must look out at the little window.
  • My husband, fellow-citizen, is a good Republican and a bold man; he has deserved well of the Republic, and possesses its confidence.
  • She will be in a state of mind to impeach the justice of the Republic.
  • I drink to the Republic.
  • How goes the Republic?
  • I am not unwilling to die, if the Republic which is to do so much good to us poor, will profit by my death; but I do not know how that can be, Citizen Evremonde.
  • Charles Evremonde, called Darnay, was accused by the public prosecutor as an emigrant, whose life was forfeit to the Republic, under the decree which banished all emigrants on pain of Death.
  • Suspected and Denounced enemy of the Republic, Aristocrat, one of a family of tyrants, one of a race proscribed, for that they had used their abolished privileges to the infamous oppression of the people.
  • It was a raw evening, and the misty river, blurred to the eye with blazing lights and to the ear with harsh noises, showed where the barges were stationed in which the smiths worked, making guns for the Army of the Republic.
  • She had seen the houses, as she came along, decorated with little pikes, and with little red caps stuck upon them; also, with tricoloured ribbons; also, with the standard inscription (tricoloured letters were the favourite), Republic One and Indivisible.
  • It was an ordinance of the Republic One and Indivisible of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death, that on the door or doorpost of every house, the name of every inmate must be legibly inscribed in letters of a certain size, at a certain convenient height from the ground.
  • Inference clear as day in this region of suspicion, that Mr. Barsad, still in the pay of the aristocratic English government, is the spy of Pitt, the treacherous foe of the Republic crouching in its bosom, the English traitor and agent of all mischief so much spoken of and so difficult to find.
  • Monseigneur gone, and the three strong men absolving themselves from the sin of having drawn his high wages, by being more than ready and willing to cut his throat on the altar of the dawning Republic one and indivisible of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death, Monseigneur’s house had been first sequestrated, and then confiscated.
  • What I have been thinking as we came along, and what I am still thinking now, as I look into your kind strong face which gives me so much support, is this:—If the Republic really does good to the poor, and they come to be less hungry, and in all ways to suffer less, she may live a long time: she may even live to be old.
  • Every town-gate and village taxing-house had its band of citizenpatriots, with their national muskets in a most explosive state of readiness, who stopped all comers and goers, cross-questioned them, inspected their papers, looked for their names in lists of their own, turned them back, or sent them on, or stopped them and laid them in hold, as their capricious judgment or fancy deemed best for the dawning Republic One and Indivisible, of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death.
  • Therefore when the President said (else had his own head quivered on his shoulders), that the good physician of the Republic would deserve better still of the Republic by rooting out an obnoxious family of Aristocrats, and would doubtless feel a sacred glow and joy in making his daughter a widow and her child an orphan, there was wild excitement, patriotic fervour, not a touch of human sympathy.
  • Therefore when the President said (else had his own head quivered on his shoulders), that the good physician of the Republic would deserve better still of the Republic by rooting out an obnoxious family of Aristocrats, and would doubtless feel a sacred glow and joy in making his daughter a widow and her child an orphan, there was wild excitement, patriotic fervour, not a touch of human sympathy.
  • The new era began; the king was tried, doomed, and beheaded; the Republic of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death, declared for victory or death against the world in arms; the black flag waved night and day from the great towers of Notre Dame; three hundred thousand men, summoned to rise against the tyrants of the earth, rose from all the varying soils of France, as if the dragon’s teeth had been sown broadcast, and had yielded fruit equally on hill and plain, on rock, in gravel,…
  • Citizen Gabelle hinted, with infinite delicacy and politeness, that in the pressure of business imposed on the Tribunal by the multitude of enemies of the Republic with which it had to deal, he had been slightly overlooked in his prison of the Abbaye—in fact, had rather passed out of the Tribunal’s patriotic remembrance—until three days ago; when he had been summoned before it, and had been set at liberty on the Jury’s declaring themselves satisfied that the accusation against him was…

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  • The United States and each of its states are republics.
  • A republic is a particular type of democracy.

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