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spectacle
in
A Tale of Two Cities
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spectacle
Used In
A Tale of Two Cities
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  • The rats had crept out of their holes to look on, and they remained looking on for hours; soldiers and police often passing between them and the spectacle, and making a barrier behind which they slunk, and through which they peeped.
  • They looked at one another, as he used his blue cap to wipe his face, on which the perspiration had started afresh while he recalled the spectacle.
  • As they walked on in silence, he could not but see how used the people were to the spectacle of prisoners passing along the streets.
  • Affected, and impressed with terror as they both were, by this spectacle of ruin, it was not a time to yield to such emotions.
  • So used are the regular inhabitants of the houses to the spectacle, that in many windows there are no people, and in some the occupation of the hands is not so much as suspended, while the eyes survey the faces in the tumbrils.
  • I stand aside, messieurs, by my heap of stones, to see the soldiers and their prisoner pass (for it is a solitary road, that, where any spectacle is well worth looking at), and at first, as they approach, I see no more than that they are six soldiers with a tall man bound, and that they are almost black to my sight—except on the side of the sun going to bed, where they have a red edge, messieurs.

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  • Marcus and his brother will enjoy such a spectacle.
    Sabaa Tahir  --  An Ember in the Ashes
  • But instead of listening to him I would have you day by day fix your eyes upon the greatness of Athens, until you become filled with the love of her; and when you are impressed by the spectacle of her glory, reflect that this empire has been acquired by men who knew their duty and had the courage to do it, who in the hour of conflict had the fear of dishonor always present to them, and who, if ever they failed in an enterprise, would not allow their virtues to be lost to their country,
    Thucydides  --  Pericles’s Funeral Oration

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